Showing posts with label Culture Feature. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Culture Feature. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Oversharing

Thoughts on the tell-all Internet culture

Social media is a creepy thing. 

Like an intimate look into your bedroom window, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Vine allow others to get a good glimpse at what it's like to be you. I don't want to alarm anyone or talk about how unsafe broadcasting yourself across the Web is, because "How to Catch a Predator" aggressively did that. But, it's crazy to think how much our perspectives on online presence have changed in less than a decade. 


I remember in seventh grade when I first embarked on my social media adventure. MySpace was my first conquest, and I loved it. As a shy private school girl, I stalked all the wild older high school kids – a world I was about to enter. I commented on my friend's pages (it sounds weird not to say "wall") constantly: writing about inside jokes, plans for the weekend and filled out questionnaires, signed with a charming (and ingenious, I thought) "LOVElizabeth."


My glory days on Myspace were short-lived. My parents quickly discovered my profile, and while they weren't going to force me to delete it, I was so embarrassed that I did anyway. How could I think it was O.K. to upload information and pictures of myself for the entire Internet audience to see? 


My hours of crafting the perfect profile page were ruined: compiling the perfect list of favorite musical artists, choosing my "top eight," agonizing over the appropriate words for my "about me" section, selecting a few of my best photos to create an exact brand of myself. (Question: how much did everyone hate the "top eight" feature? The act of publicly declaring and un-declaring your best friends always seemed wrong to me.)


I eventually recreated my Myspace profile, although quickly graduated to Facebook once high school hit. (I recently logged on to my long lost Myspace account, and insist you do the same as soon as you can. Nostalgia and self-loathing in its best form.) 


Nowadays online, anything goes. Headed to the beach? Tweet about it. Got a new haircut? Cue Instagram selfie. Not happy with the latest results on The Voice? It's time for a Facebook status. Gone to a concert? Vine it. 


It's terrifying, really. All it takes to learn the details of your everyday life is a quick Google search of your name in quotations. My results include my profiles for LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Etsy, numerous articles from my local newspaper where I'm mentioned, the student newspaper I work at, a camp I attended years ago, Ladies' Home Journal from when I contributed a photo and a couple random websites. 


To avoid being hypocritical, I will say that I'm not at all in favor of abandoning widespread sharing on social media. It's the way of the times, and to ignore it would be archaic. As both participant in and observer of the "social media age," it's necessary to note the change in personal censorship over the last five years. 


"The idea of social media–having an audience and taking pictures for people to see–that's a scary thing. When I was young, things were simpler." 
-Sofia Coppola to W Magazine, June/July 2013 issue



Image: collage by Moshekwa Langa

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Diet Coke and Fashion



When I think of Diet Coke and fashion at the same time, which I often do not, the first commonality that comes to mind is, unsurprisingly, dieting. Conceivably an entirely different taste than its full-calorie counterpart, Coca-Cola, if Diet Coke is your preferred drink, you can essentially have your cake and eat it too. All of the love, all of the flavor, without the calories. 

Reportedly, Karl Lagerfeld drinks nothing but the beverage, a habit I can't seem to wrap my head around.


Collaborations among fashion houses and accessible brands seem to debut every other week: Prabal Gurung for Target, Karl Lagerfeld for Fossil, Maison Martin Margiela for H&M, Kate Spade for Keds. Although collaboration lines are arguably much more affordable in comparison to their namesake house, some pieces still too heavily bear the costly weight of the designer's name. 

Enter Diet Coke. The company has routinely selected "celebrity" designer creative directors who sign on temporarily to design cans or bottles to the tune of their characteristic style. Big hitters like Karl Lagerfeld, Jean Paul Gaultier, Diane Von Furstenberg and most recently Marc Jacobs have all applied their signature designs to the already iconic can. 

But what's the point of having a Diet Coke can with some high-end designer's latest interpretation on it? 

Rob Bayne, senior brand manager for Diet Coke in North West Europe and Nordics, answers with, "Fashion is a top interest of our fans so we started designer collaborations to create something new and exciting to our drinkers."

Yes, high-low designer collaborations are a fad, but a good one. People love their designer goods, no matter if they're from Bergdorf Goodman or H&M. Aside from the Neiman Marcus for Target collection earlier this winter (in which most merchandise ended up at 75 percent off), every collaboration with Target has been a success. 

It's ultimately about combining novelty with accessibility. Think about designer perfumes. A 1.6-ounce bottle of Dolce & Gabbana's Light Blue is $69, a price that is downright affordable when comparing to their $1,025 cotton-blend lace T-shirt. The Diet Coke collaborations are similar, yet on a much less expensive and more quickly consumed level. 

Where will fashion exert its influence next?





Photo sources: top, Marc Jacobs for Diet Coke campaign; middle, Karl Lagerfeld for Diet Coke launch; bottom: Jean Paul Gaultier for Diet Coke bottles, Karl Lagerfeld for Diet Coke bottles, Diane von Furstenberg for Diet Coke bottles, Marc Jacobs for Diet Coke cans

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

History Lesson // Barbies


For me, a childhood without Barbies would have been endlessly monotonous. I spent hours each day carefully crafting my ballerina-pink room into its own seemingly self-sufficient plastic paradise. There was the mall, the pet shop, a few cars and a grocery store. Plenty of glitter, too. I would line my dolls up in a neat line, brush their hair, change their clothes and begin my own childlike narrative. But what was Barbie's story?

As wife of Mattel co-founder and mother to Barbara and Kenneth (that's not a joke), Ruth Handler was one of the few who had insight to both sides of the toy business- production and consumption. As she watched her daughter play with flimsy paper dolls, she noticed a gap in the market-- dolls that looked like adults as opposed to the ever-so-common baby doll. 

Ruth's husband Elliot initially rejected the idea, not willing to make such a bold maneuver into unknown toy territory. Upon visiting Germany shortly after her proposal, Ruth saw exactly what she was looking for: a successful doll for young girls modeled after an adult called Bild Lilli. She purchased a few and worked with a Mattel product developer to tweak the doll to appropriate American standards, and Barbie was born.

On March 9, 1959, Barbie made her debut at the American International Toy Fair. The date is also the official birthday of Barbie, whose full yet fictional name is Barbara Millicent Roberts. Her biography states that she hails from Willows, Wisconsin and has younger sisters Skipper, Kelly and Krissy. It appears that Barbie has lived a well-experienced life, with over 40 different pets including dogs, horses and a zebra, and that she has dabbled in more than 100 occupations. She has a rocky romantic relationship with cutie Ken Carson with their last big break up released as a press report by Mattel in 2004. 

Barbie has become a cultural icon over the years, needless to say. She represents so much more than a childhood plaything and has served as a muse to a number of professionals across industries. Pop Art prince Andy Warhol added Barbie to his list of clients in 1985, creating yet another version of his signature multicolored portraits. Interior and graphic designer Jonathan Adler debuted his 3,500 square foot Barbie Malibu Dream House in 2009 complete with plenty of pink, velvet and "B" monograms. Project Runway mentor and author Tim Gunn created a small collection for Barbie earlier this summer with stylish separates and smart accessories (but who could expect less?). 



Oh, to walk in Barbie's shoes. She certainly gets the elite treatments. 

I'll admit- I still enjoy walking down the pastel pink Barbie aisle at stores, always amazed and slightly envious at what Mattel keeps coming up with. It undoubtedly brings back a multitude of memories. 

Sources: Original Barbie imageBarbie by Andy WarholJonathan Adler Malibu Barbie Dream House, Barbie Styled by Tim Gunn

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

History Lesson // French Macarons

The macaron, a confectioner's sweet and airy delight is a merengue-based cookie that hails from the fashionable streets of Paris, slowly and surely charming its way into parties and baking books all across the world. 

If you've ever tasted one, you surely understand the macaron's trending popularity. A dainty sandwich that melts in the mouth with seemingly endless flavor profiles, and possibly the fact that they are French (we just can't help it) all contribute to the welcome spread of these tasty treats. 

They are the perfect companion for just about any activity. Waking up with coffee and the paper (a more accepted version of "cake-for-breakfast"), accompanying an afternoon tea (or nap), or a post-dinner dessert all suffice for consumption of this marvelous little cookie. 

So, as I commonly ask in the History Lesson, where did they come from?

As usual, there's a little confusion and debate on exactly where and when macarons first appeared. Fortunately for us, the most reported version is also the most glamorous version (as in, it involves royalty). 

According to many-a-source, the macaron first appeared in Italy at the hands of Catherine de Medici's (yes, of the banking and art-collecting Florence Medici family) personal chef around the time of her marriage to the Duc d'Orleans in 1533. Not long after he became the king of France as Henry II, thus moving the macaron to the country it's currently so commonly associated with.

It's important to know that the macaron did not start out as a sandwich, but simply as a single light cookie with no filling, topping, or what-have-you. Another fun fact: 'macaron' and 'macaroni' are unsurprisingly from the same origin, a word meaning "fine dough."

Their popularity spread during the French Revolution when two sisters baked and sold them to support themselves during the troubling time. Thus, a staple was born.

The sandwich version was created in the 20th century by the grandson of Louis Ernest Laduree of the Laduree pastry salon in Paris, still one of the most celebrated macaron bakeries today. He had the idea to fill two shells with a chocolate panache, and it stuck.

You may recall my two attempts at making macarons- delicious yet ugly here, and still delicious but slightly less ugly here. They take a skillful and steady hand- something I've not quite acquired. I've been known to eat multiples (and multiples) of macarons in one sitting, so perhaps it's good and well I'm not procuring the perfect little pastries right and left.

I'm going to go ahead and apologize for any cravings this little dabble has spurred on.


Image Source: Gilt Taste

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

History Lesson // Playing Cards


We've all done our fair share of card playing. We grew up with them- playing Go Fish as a child, watching them in action in Alice and Wonderland, and maybe even passing them around the table in college during a game of heightened debauchery. They're the quintessential time-passer, a gambling accessory, and a social icon. So... where did they come from?

Historians debate on the exact origins of the deck of cards. Most, though, believe that they originated some time during the 9th century in China, as they were the first to invent paper back in the 2nd century (can you imagine- no paper?). Within about 200 years playing cards had migrated all over the Asian continent and featured characters of popular lore as the first face cards.

It is widely believed that playing cards made their way to Europe via Middle Eastern countries in the 1400's. Their popularity quickly spread and each region developed their own style- different face cards, different amounts of suits, and so on. In Germany, common suits of the time were acorns, bells, leaves, and hearts. The French created the card suits on which we base our modern-day decks, basing the club off of the acorn and the spade off of the leaf.

Europeans additionally altered face cards to represent their respective royalty. The first face cards were king, chevalier (knight), and knave (male child or prince). In the 17th century England it was conjectured that the "k" of king and the "kn" of knave on the corners of cards were too similar, causing confusion in the heat of the game, so the knave became a jack.

Initially the king was always considered the highest card, although in France during the French Revolution especially, a special value was placed on the then lowest card, the ace. Games with a high ace were used as symbolism by the expanding lower class to illustrate their rise to power at the time.

I hope you all enjoyed this little historical blurb. I'm trying to make the history lesson posts very relevant and not dry- so let me know how I'm doing and if there's any subjects you'd like to hear about. Happy Tuesday!

Image source: Kate Spade Instagram

Monday, July 9, 2012

Designer Spotlight//Banana Republic

The store Banana Republic is a brand synonymous with high quality American leisure wear epitomizing classic and everyday cuts. Skirts, shirts, and pants with clean lines are signature pieces along with well-crafted accessories and jewelry. 

Something the brand is also synonymous with is the historical term "banana republic," which I hadn't heard of until I took a decent college history class. In history, the term refers to a small politically unstable country that depends on exporting goods to a larger wealthier country for their primary economic profits. 

Honduras and Guatemala are considered banana republics because they had very large pieces of land owned by American and European fruit corporations (this is where bananas come in)- huge monopolies for private profit. 

So what does this have to do with clothes? 

In 1978 husband and wife duo Mel and Patricia Zeigler started Banana Republic as a safari travel-themed clothing company. Thus, stemming from the term banana republic. They originally had only two stores and made the bulk of their profit from, once again, travel-themed illustrated catalogues featuring exotic locales. 


The Gap Inc., which now includes The Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, Piperlime (a personal favorite), and Athleta, bought Banana Republic in 1983 and immediately began rebranding the store to create a more upscale version of The Gap as a mainstream luxury retailer- how we see BR today.

Recently, Banana Republic has had some rather exciting collaborations that have caught the attention of  high-fashion and everyday shoppers alike. On March 1 of this year, they launched a 40-piece country club-like collection designed by Janie Bryant, the costume designer of hit series Mad Men. If you've ever watched the show, you'll notice a strong nostalgia of longing for a period you were never alive for (well, maybe some of you were). The male model for the collection looks eerily like a young version of Don Draper (Jon Hamm for those of you who don't watch the show), which is always a plus.


This summer, they launched a Trina Turk for Banana Republic collection that features the signature colorful graphics and clean lines of the higher-end designer. Model Coco Rocha starred in the ad campaign- if you haven't checked our her wildly popular tumblr, go now! She's fun to follow along with, and it's hard not to be slightly envious of her jet-setting designer-wearing lifestyle.


Banana Republic also has a wonderful tumblr that chronicles new collections and the behind the scenes of shoots and runway shows.


Whew! I know that was a bit long-winded, but I feel like it's always interesting and fun to learn where your clothes are coming from and the ideas behind them. For Designer Spotlight, I'm going to try to alternate between high-end and everyday designers and companies, so for next week, look out for something a little more exclusive.

Image sources: old school//Mad Men//Trina Turk//runway

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Art to Inspiration: July

I've decided to join in for Chevrons & Eclairs' monthly Art to Inspiration series, which celebrates artists new and old as a source of inspiration and learning for the community. This month featured photographer Smita Jacob of Hogger & Co., with the below photograph called Healing Yoga with Arti. Join in for next month here

I loved the simplicity and colors of this photo, and the fact that it was taken on an ice-skating rink. The rooms I included are somehow both sparse and ornate with attention to detail. I love the crisp black and white bookshelf (honestly, I'm a sucker for books of any kind) and the pink far-east accoutrements in the second room. Of course, I had to include an outfit- something perfect for a day about town. And who can resist those lovely Carven flats with bows?




Image credits: 1//2

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

History Lesson: Marilyn Monroe


I was watching the movie My Week With Marilyn a few weeks back and realized how little I actually know about the bombshell leading lady. She is, in fact, from an era long before our time (unless you were born before 1962).

Born Norma Jeane Mortenson in 1926 to an absent father and a mentally and financially unstable mother, Marilyn spent her childhood in various foster homes in the Los Angeles area. In order to prevent her from going back into the foster care system, in 1942 Marilyn married her then current boyfriend, James Dougherty, as her first of three marriages.

She began modeling while her husband was off at war, and dyed her natural brunette locks to her signature golden blonde. She caught the attention of a Twentieth Century Fox executive, who suggested changing her name to a more "sexy" and alliterative Marilyn Monroe. She and her husband divorced and shortly after in 1947, she landed her first small film role.

Marilyn quickly gained popularity among both producers and the public and continued her upward rise to fame in Hollywood. She starred in a number of big hit films that portrayed her as a "dumb blonde," catapulting her success as a comedienne and sex symbol. Her most notable films included How to Marry a Millionaire, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (in which she sang "Diamond's are a Girl's Best Friend"), The Seven Year Itch, Some Like it Hot, and The Prince and the Showgirl. She was briefly married to Joe DeMaggio in 1954, and then married playwright Arthur Miller in 1956.

While Marilyn's life seemed to be teeming with success and grandiose parties, there was an underlying negativity that pervaded her personal life and eventually lead to her death. She proved to be a rather difficult actress to work with, often having fits of stage fright and showing up late or not at all. In The Prince and the Showgirl, costar and director Laurence Olivier remarked that although Marilyn was quite the stunning actress, she was rather difficult to work with.

Despite winning an Academy Award for Some Like It Hot, Marilyn's health deteriorated and she began consuming large amounts of alcohol and seeing many different doctors to have access to a number of drugs. She and Arthur Miller divorced in 1961, and shortly after she spent some time in rehab facilities. On August 5, 1962, Marilyn was pronounced dead at her home in Los Angeles, with an autopsy confirming the death was due to acute drug poisoning and a probable suicide. She was 36 years old.

I put together a look based off the famous photo of her wearing a white plunge v-neck dress with the street vents blowing up the dress- yes, you know the one. Modern and classic at the same time, and with plenty of pretty baubles. It's perfect for a night of club hopping in Hollywood dodging paparazzi-  or just drinks with the girls. Don't forget the red lipstick!



//Image source//

Monday, July 2, 2012

Designer Spotlight: Missoni

Known for their vast collections of knits bearing bold geometric patterns in an endless array of colors, the dynastic Italian fashion house Missoni is one of the world’s most influential and innovative brands. The empire is currently headed in Milan by the second generation of Missonis, and staffed additionally by the third generation, furthering not only the brand but also the jet-setting and forward style the founders fashioned so masterfully.

In a nutshell, it all began with in London with an uncomplicated love story. Ottavio Missoni, an athlete on the Italian National Track team, was competing in the summer 1948 Olympics in London while Rosita Jelmini, also from Italy, was there to perfect her knowledge of the English language. In short, the two married five years later. In the same year, the two set up a small knitwear workshop, following in the steps of Rosita’s family.

The 1960’s were a significant time of expansion and recognition for the Missonis, whose dresses began to gradually appear in fashion magazines, leading the way with dresses in endless patterns inspired by Art Deco. They moved into a larger workshop and perfected the rayon-viscose fabric blend that would eventually become their iconic favorite.

Today, the power designing couple has handed the reigns of the fashion house to their three children Vittorio, Luca, and Angela, who took the place of her mother as creative director. Angela's daughter, Margherita, serves as the accessories designer and unofficial muse.

The Missonis, with their wholesome looks and values, have served as one of the foremost fashion houses for almost sixty years. Their beautiful graphic and iconic prints have certainly made their mark in both fashion and graphic design history.


Image Sources: Left- Resort 2012; Angela, Rosita, and Margherita at Missoni for Target; SS 2009 campaign; Missoni at the Museum of Everything; Right- Camilla Belle at Missoni for Target; vintage ad campaign, Ottavio and Margherita

Monday, June 25, 2012

Designer Spotlight: J Crew




J. Crew is perhaps one of the most iconic brands for smartly-dressed men, women, and children all around the world. With cleans lines, beautiful silhouettes, and impeccable quality in both fabric and make, the company has created a vast empire of cashmere and classic button down sporting followers who crave cult favorites such as the No. 2 Pencil Skirt (now on sale!) and Italian Leather Classic Ballet Flats

J. Crew began twenty-nine years ago in 1983 solely as a mail-order catalog company. The eighties were a time when catalogs were major revenue makers, with companies like Lands' End and L. L. Bean at the helm of the competition. Originally called Popular Club plan (until 1989), J. Crew aimed to create looks similar to the "Ralph Lauren" style but at a lower cost, in other words, leisure wear for the upper-middle class. 

In 1989, the company officially became called J. Crew and opened their first flagship store in downtown Manhattan. Since then, more than 300 retails stores have opened nationwide, including J. Crew, J. Crew Factory, and newer more on-trend sister store Madewell

I will be honest. If I could wear only J. Crew, I would. Yet, my college-student budget does not always allow for such a thing. In the mean time, I think I'll browse old catalog spreads and The Pink Peonies, who wears J. Crew in almost all of her outfits (flawlessly, I'll add). Preppy and classic perfection.

Cheers!

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Baubles and Baubles

I know that I just did a roundup of jewelry, but I was browsing Bauble Bar I couldn't help but spend a good little bit of time pouring over all of the pretty art deco-like pieces they have right now and mentally pairing them with my own outfits for a fun night out on the town (if only!).


Most of you are probably like me in that you know somewhat what the term "art deco" means, and can peg a few buildings (The Chrysler Building in NYC), pieces of jewelry, and runway collections to the style. I decided to do a little bit of research to help understand the concept more. Here's the gist of the art deco movement.

The term art deco was coined in the 1920's in, of course, Paris. It encompassed architecture, art, industrial and interior design, fashion, jewelry, and more, and focused on glamour, elegance, and modernity. Art deco ideas drew ideas from earlier twentieth century concepts such as cubism and modernism and influenced many other well-known movements such as pop art and film noir (look for more on these two later!). While a lot of artistic movements are based from philosophical beliefs and ideas, art deco is solely, well, decorative, and draws from the geometric shapes of the classical Greco-Romans, Aztecs and ancient Egyptians. Faceted, crystalline, and repeated features are a common characteristic of an art deco piece, as well as the use of materials such as chrome, lacquer, and wood.

Old-fashioned yet modern, bold yet streamline, austere yet ornate. I'm really loving this trend Bauble Bar has going on right now. And the best part? It's all so wonderfully affordable. So please, indulge yourself in a little bit of old Hollywood glamour. It's a revival that can only be considered necessary.

Friday, June 15, 2012

My Friday Fancies: Copy Cat

There's something about Audrey Hepburn's persona that is so winningly endearing, especially as Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany's. So why not emulate the gorgeous gal in the classic film?


Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Art Meets Fashion: Cocoa & Hearts

Sometimes simple and colorful is best. I love artist Jen Ramos' vivid and brilliantly hued brushstroke paintings that come out (and quickly sell out!) every so often on her website Cocoa and Hearts. She uses a delightful array of colors in her work, always bright and in beautiful combination. Jen has another design platform called MadeByGirl that creates paper goods and prints (remember this?), and a delightful blog also titled MadeByGirl that features interior design, fashion, and other lifestyle bits.

You'll be seeing a lot of new weekly/biweekly/monthly features and other changes on The Corner Apartment in the next few weeks, including today's Art Meets Fashion. Taking cue from a number of other bloggers who do a similar feature, I figured inspiring an outfit from art, considering my love of art (and oncoming art history minor!), is an excellent way to combine culture and fashion. Expect "real-life" artists such as Jen and historic greats like Picasso and Derain as well. I hope you enjoy!



Monday, June 4, 2012

Designer Spotlight: Milly

After studying at FIT and working at renowned fashion houses such as Hermes, Louis Vuitton, and Christian Dior Haute Couture, Michelle Smith set out to create her own line with sophisticated and elegant details. Thus, Milly was born in 2001, debuting collections with timeless silhouettes, clean lines, and perfectly preppy feminine qualities. Using luxurious fabrics of bright prints and colors, Milly faultlessly creates modern styles with a vintage air. Milly has a flagship boutique in NYC on Madison Avenue and is sold in fine department stores such as Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman, and Saks Fifth Avenue all over the world.



Where to find:
Brushstroke Kali Strapless Dress//Vivienne Sheath Dress//Haley Trapunto Dress//Calais Striped Tube Top Dress//Julia Dress//Darcie Combo Dress//Sari Beaded Dress

//Runway pictures//

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Classical Reverie

I was planning on doing a little feature on Penguin's Clothbound Classics, of which I have three of and am absolutely in love with. Their bright candy color illustrations are enough to make any girl who remotely likes a good ol' classic giddy with excitement. I do like my Kindle very much (and its Kate Spade cover just the same), but have a special place in my heart for beautifully-bound classics.

I stopped in my tracks when I saw these. I cannot believe I've never come across these before! Artist Jillian Tamaki spent months designing the three covers, and with perfect technique. While the actual books themselves are not embroidered (hence the $16 price tag), they do have sculptural embossing. Very beautiful handiwork, indeed.






//Source//

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Reading

I'm sure I'm not the first to admit that my list of books to read is ever-growing. Unfortunately, most of my time reading is spent in the library with a hefty textbook as opposed to being cozied up with hot tea and my Kindle. Fortunately, summer for me is a little over two weeks away, and I already have a little lineup waiting for me on my Kindle the moment finals are over. A couple classics, a bit of art, Paris, and grammar. Sounds just about right.


1. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
3. Confessions of an Art Addict by Peggy Guggenheim
4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
6. The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson 

Friday, July 1, 2011

Picture this

In art history this past semester we learned a lot about photography and the more believable illusions of realty it created. Cindy Sherman posed in staged photographs that were made to look like film stills, feeding into the phenomenon that not all photography is telling a true story.



Untitled Film Still #7 (1977)


Untitled Film Still #14 (1977)


Untitled Film Still #43 (1977)


Listening to: Act Naturally by The Beatles. Hear it.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Summer's Past


I'll never be condsidered a west coast girl, and that's okay. I can't imagine living in such a busy and ever-changing place like California, but I will say that visisting San Francisco, San Jose, Palo Alto and Sonoma Valley with my family was one of my favorite trips. We visited a beautiful winery, strolled through Fisherman's Wharf, canoed through a redwood forest, walked along the cliffs above the ocean, and had wonderful food although I'm not partial to seafood. It was such a wonderful trip.

Listening to: West Coast by Coconut Records. Hear it.